Practical Magick

You may remember that I’m transitioning Christianity out of the rather prominent place it had in my path. Not because I no longer believe my rather “eccentric” (or possibly more crazy) beliefs concerning Christianity, but because my calling was never really to be a full on Christian, no matter how much I enjoyed it. I was called to observe, learn, and contemplate. But I very quickly feel in love with Catholicism, even when I didn’t believe quite what they did, and found a very different meaning in every act and word. I enjoyed the liturgy so much. It became important to me. Some of you may remember how scandalous it was last year during holy week when I began posting about it. Holy week was very important to me. And now, I find it very difficult to be so distant from it. I hated missing palm Sunday last week. And I hate missing Good Friday mass today, and Easter vigil tomorrow. And possibly Easter mass on Sunday. I feel like I’m losing my best friend. But what right do I have to be there if I’m not called to be there? Friends and family will be there, yes. But does that even matter? The familiar mass is one of the only things that fully dispels my anxiety, because I feel so safe there. As safe as in my own temple.

noordzee:

Ancient Greek Lady-Monster Valentines, because I love the morbid sense of humor I develop around these gals. HERE is a full-resolution printable sheet of all four, the page is 8x10.5 inches.

Featuring a Siren, Sphinx, Medusa, and also Eris. She isn’t exactly a monster but shhhh. I referenced their appearances from ancient art, though I have to admit I kind of took artistic license with Medusa’s face and hair. The original Gorgons had scary-ugly faces and normal hair with a couple snakes. A head full of snakes is just so much more fun to draw…!

I have buckets more ideas for these, so I might do more! Because if a joke’s worth making it’s worth running into the ground, that’s what I say :D

noordzee:

More Mythology-lady valentines! Less monstrous, no less dangerous. Well, except for the Graeae, they’re just old and creepy. Like last time, HERE is a full sheet of all four, print away, freefreefree!

So this time we have an Amazon, a Maenad, half-crazed worshipper of Dionysus, the enchantress Circe, and the Graeae or Gray Sisters, who are NOT the Fates, Disney… Again, I referenced artworks for their appearances. The Graeae are not very well-represented in the greek canon, though, so I drew from that delightful genre of Hellenistic art: Statues Of Decrepit Old Ladies.

First set is here! Thank you everyone, by the way, who have supported that first set! I hope you like this one, too!

bythegods:

It is easy to read the story of Medea as told by Seneca as a critique on the effects of passions on the mind set on a person.  However, the violence of the story while coming physically from Medea finds its roots in the actions of those around her.  The dismissal of her pain and hurt by those that she had sacrificed so much for was the catalyst for the harm and death that we read.  The only wrong Medea is guilty of is that she is a woman with power, who from the outset of the play is already in a disenfranchised position.
Medea stands in precarious in a situation and instead of bowing to the pressures of her situations; she uses what is available to her to act with agency and impose her will on others.  It was not until after meetings with Creon then Jason, who consistently ignore her desires and pleas, that she reaches a breaking point.  She sacrificed her brother, left her homeland, murdered for the sake of Jason and his glory.  Yet when the time comes to dispense punishment, Medea alone must face comeuppance.  Mirroring the actions and behaviors of Jason, Medea ignores ideals of morality and social obligation.   Michael Zelenak compares the two characters thusly “(Medea) insists on her right to do what male protagonists have always done - to define herself and become her vision of herself, regardless of law or morality. In a man, this is called a tragic protagonist. In a woman, it is called a monster, or “a witch,” (Zelenak 17).  Not only does being a stranger in a strange land put Medea in an inferior position in regards to other characters, but the mere fact that she is a woman, a supernaturally powerful woman at that, paint the perception of others have of her.  The fear of the damage that she is capable of bringing down kept the other characters from approaching her, as she truly was, a wounded woman.  It is possible that the violent outcome could have been avoided had a proper discussion between the characters.  However, all characters with direct contact with Medea reject her feelings of betrayal as out of control passions and minimized her as a person, she took a course of action that she felt could not be ignored as easily as her words were.
photocredit: Medea - cover illustration- ©Editions Faton 2014 byThomasBrissot

bythegods:

It is easy to read the story of Medea as told by Seneca as a critique on the effects of passions on the mind set on a person.  However, the violence of the story while coming physically from Medea finds its roots in the actions of those around her.  The dismissal of her pain and hurt by those that she had sacrificed so much for was the catalyst for the harm and death that we read.  The only wrong Medea is guilty of is that she is a woman with power, who from the outset of the play is already in a disenfranchised position.

Medea stands in precarious in a situation and instead of bowing to the pressures of her situations; she uses what is available to her to act with agency and impose her will on others.  It was not until after meetings with Creon then Jason, who consistently ignore her desires and pleas, that she reaches a breaking point.  She sacrificed her brother, left her homeland, murdered for the sake of Jason and his glory.  Yet when the time comes to dispense punishment, Medea alone must face comeuppance.  Mirroring the actions and behaviors of Jason, Medea ignores ideals of morality and social obligation.   Michael Zelenak compares the two characters thusly “(Medea) insists on her right to do what male protagonists have always done - to define herself and become her vision of herself, regardless of law or morality. In a man, this is called a tragic protagonist. In a woman, it is called a monster, or “a witch,” (Zelenak 17).  Not only does being a stranger in a strange land put Medea in an inferior position in regards to other characters, but the mere fact that she is a woman, a supernaturally powerful woman at that, paint the perception of others have of her.  The fear of the damage that she is capable of bringing down kept the other characters from approaching her, as she truly was, a wounded woman.  It is possible that the violent outcome could have been avoided had a proper discussion between the characters.  However, all characters with direct contact with Medea reject her feelings of betrayal as out of control passions and minimized her as a person, she took a course of action that she felt could not be ignored as easily as her words were.

photocredit: Medea - cover illustration- ©Editions Faton 2014 byThomasBrissot

In some older versions of Persephone’s story, she was a young woman, not a young girl, and instead of accidentally wandering away, she had gone deliberately adventuring, when she fell, or was lured, or was kidnapped into Hell. Here Persephone’s adventurous spirit leads her into difficulty, instead of her being a passive victim of the wickedness of others. Her relationship with her mother gives her the courage to explore her world, and when events take a bad turn, their relationship gives her the strength to survive.

In a still older version, Persephone heard the despairing cries of the dead and chose freely to go into the Underworld to comfort them. Hades does not appear at all, in this version. Here Persephone’s descent to hell illustrates inclusiveness for every being, whether in the Underworld or in our present one, and shows that mercy is integral to her nature.

In the most ancient layer of myth, Persephone’s name means “She Who Destroys The Light.” She was the powerful Goddess of the Underworld long before anyone knew of Hades. Like the Indian Kali, the Irish Morrigan, and the Sumerian Ereshkegal, she was the Goddess of Death.

(x)

*BTG asterisk: source unreliable, but there’s some good information here, and I like the interpretations on Persephone’s changing motivations.

(via bythegods)

necromanaura:

)O(   ~practicalmagic~  

thenightengaleofnocturnal:

ofools:

don’t fuck with my metaphorical legs thanks

wait, is that supposed to be Loki? I’m trying to decipher who that is. All i can guess is that that might be Loki.

That’s who I took it to be lol

ofools:

don’t fuck with my metaphorical legs thanks